NOMURA Koji

写真a

Affiliation

Research Centers and Institutes, Keio Economic Observatory (Mita)

Position

Professor

E-mail Address

E-mail address

Career 【 Display / hide

  • 1996.04
    -
    2003.03

    Keio University,, Keio Economic Observatory,, Assistant Professor

  • 2003.04
    -
    2005.03

    Harvard University,, Kennedy School of Government,, CBG fellow

  • 2003.04
    -
    2017.03

    Keio University,, Keio Economic Observatory,, Associate Professor

  • 2005.07
    -
    2008.09

    Cabinet Office, Government of Japan,, ESRI (Economic Social Research Institute),, Visiting Fellow

  • 2006.11
    -
    2007.08

    OECD, STI (Directorate for Science, Technology and Industry),, Economist

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Academic Background 【 Display / hide

  • 1989.03

    Hakodate Chubu High School, Hokkaido

    Graduated

  • 1993.03

    Keio University, Faculty of Business and Commerce

    University, Graduated

  • 1995.03

    Keio University, Graduate School of Business and Commerce

    Graduate School, Completed, Master's course

  • 1998.03

    Keio University, Graduate School of Business and Commerce

    Graduate School, Withdrawal after completion of doctoral course requirements, Doctoral course

Academic Degrees 【 Display / hide

  • M.A., Keio University, Coursework, 1995.03

  • Ph.D, Keio University, Dissertation, 2005

 

Research Areas 【 Display / hide

  • Economic policy

  • Economic statistics

Research Keywords 【 Display / hide

  • Economic Growth, Capital and Productivity

  • Energy and Environment

  • Labor Input and Human Capital

  • Japanese and Asian Economies

 

Books 【 Display / hide

  • APO Productivity Databook 2018

    Koji Nomura and Fukunari Kimura, Asian Productivity Organization, 2018.09

    Scope: pp.1-170

     View Summary

    This is the eleventh edition in the APO Productivity Databook series. Productivity gains, which enable an economy to produce more for the same amount of inputs, or to consume less to produce the same amount of outputs, are the only route to sustainable economic growth in the long run. Thus, it follows that monitoring and improving national productivity capability are important targets of public policy. The Databook aims to provide a useful reference for the quality of economic growth and productivity, which are comparable across countries at different development stages in Asia. A significant achievement of this edition of the Databook is the projection out to 2030 of the future economic growth. In this edition of the Databook, baseline indicators on economic growth and productivity are calculated for 30 Asian economies, representing the 20 Asian Productivity Organization member economies (APO20) and the 10 non-member economies in Asia. The APO20 consists of Bangladesh, Cambodia, the Republic of China (ROC), Fiji, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, the Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran), Japan, the Republic of Korea (Korea), the Lao People’s Democratic Republic (Lao PDR), Malaysia, Mongolia, Nepal, Pakistan, the Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Vietnam. The 10 non-member economies in Asia are: the People’s Republic of China (China), the Kingdom of Bhutan (Bhutan), Brunei, Myanmar, and the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) that consists of Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE). In addition, Australia, the European Union (EU), Turkey, and the United States (US) are included as reference economies. This edition covers the period from 1970 to 2016.

  • Green Productivity and Productivity Measurement Program for Myanmar

    Koji Nomura et al., Asian Productivity Organization, 2018.09

    Scope: pp.1-123

  • "Productivity Growth in Asia and its Country Origins," in Deb Kusum Das (eds.) Productivity Dynamics in Emerging and Industrialized Countries

    Koji Nomura, Routledge, 2018.04

    Scope: Chapter 3 (pp.81-112)

     View Summary

    © 2018 selection and editorial matter, Deb Kusum Das; individual chapters, the contributors. Recovery from the global financial crisis of 2008-09 has been notably slow in the European economy, with its growth rate for 2010-14 steady at 0.5 percent per annum on average, relative to 2.1 percent growth in the pre-crisis period of 2000-07 (as represented by 15 member countries of EU prior to enlargement). In contrast, the United States has managed to raise its growth rate to 1.9 percent for 2010-14, and is beginning to return to its long-term growth track. The Asian economy, which has become increasingly autonomous from the Western economies and even contributed to stabilizing the global economy at the time of the global financial crisis, has been maintaining a stable economic growth of 5.3 percent per annum on average during 2010-14. Yet, this represents a slowdown of 1 percentage point from the level recorded in the pre-crisis period. Our study indicates that it is mainly due to the reduction in the growth of total factor productivity (TFP) of the Asian economy.

  • APO Productivity Databook 2017

    Koji Nomura and Fukunari Kimura, Asian Productivity Organization, 2017.09

    Scope: pp.1-166

     View Summary

    This publication is the tenth edition in the APO Productivity Databook series. The Databook aims to provide a useful reference for the quality of economic growth in Asia. It presents authoritative estimates of productivity and its decomposition, which are comparable across countries at different development stages in the middle and long run. Productivity gains, which enable an economy to produce more for the same amount of inputs or to consume less to produce the same amount of outputs, are the only route to sustainable economic growth in the long run. Thus it follows that monitoring and improving national productivity capability are important targets of public policy.
    In this edition of the Databook, baseline indicators on economic growth and productivity are calculated for 30 Asian economies, representing the 20 Asian Productivity Organization member economies (APO20) and the 10 non-member economies in Asia. The APO20 consists of Bangladesh, Cambodia, the Republic of China (ROC), Fiji, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, the Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran), Japan, the Republic of Korea (Korea), the Lao People’s Democratic Republic (Lao PDR), Malaysia, Mongolia, Nepal, Pakistan, the Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Vietnam. The 10 non-member economies in Asia are: the People’s Republic of China (China), the Kingdom of Bhutan (Bhutan), Brunei, Myanmar, and the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) that consists of Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE). In addition, Australia, the European Union (EU), Turkey, and the United States (US) are included as reference economies. This edition covers the period from 1970 to 2015.

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Papers 【 Display / hide

  • "Benchmark 2011 Integrated Estimates of the Japan-U.S. Price Level Index for Industry Outputs"

    Koji Nomura, Kozo Miyagawa, and Jon D. Samuels

    BEA Working Paper (Bureau of Economic Analysis, the U.S. Department of Commerce)   2018.12

    Research paper (bulletin of university, research institution), Joint Work, Except for reviews

     View Summary

    This paper provides new benchmark estimates of industry-level price differentials between Japan and the U.S. for 2011 based on a bilateral price accounting model anchored to the Japan-US input-output tables. We apply the model to translate available demand-side data on purchaser’s price PPPs for final uses (e.g. the Eurostat-OECD PPPs) and intermediate uses (e.g. the METI survey) to unmeasured producer’s price PPPs for industry output. These PPPs allow us to produce price level indexes at the industry level, which we use to assess price competitiveness between Japan and the U.S. Under the nominal exchange rate of 110.6 yen per dollar as of the beginning of July 2018, we estimate that producers in Japan have a pricing advantage in 66 of 106 industries in the manufacturing sector, and in 24 of 50 industries in the service sector. We conclude that price competitiveness of Japanese service industries has considerably improved in the more recent time period. However, Japanese producers have a significant price disadvantage in comparison to their U.S. counterparts in electricity and gas supply, and most of the agricultural producing industries.

  • "Measurement of Depreciation Rates using Microdata from Disposal Survey of Japan"

    Koji Nomura and Yutaka Suga

    The 35th IARIW General Conference, Copenhagen, Denmark  2018.08

    Research paper (other science council materials etc.), Joint Work, Except for reviews

     View Summary

    This paper estimates the asset service lives (ASL), the rates of depreciation, and the declining balance rates (DBR) based on a finely-defined classification of assets, which distinguishes 369 asset types, using data on ASL and aged-prices of disposed assets collected in the Survey on Capital Expenditures and Disposals from 2006 to 2014 in Japan. This survey collected 1,111,913 data of disposed assets from business accounts of private corporations, of which 936,861 are defined as retired assets acquired new and are used to estimate the survival profiles, and of which 84,291 are defined as sold assets for continued uses with positive prices are used to estimate the age-price profiles.
    The Japan’s rates of geometric depreciation estimated in this study are broadly similar to the estimates at Statistics Canada (Baldwin, Liu, and Tanguay, 2015), but considerably higher than those used in the U.S. BEA (2013), e.g. 7.5%, 7.3%, and 3.2%, respectively, for industrial building construction, 7.6%, 6.7%, and 2.5% for office buildings, 29.1%, 27.9%, and 19.3% for automobiles, 24.4%, 24.9%, and 11.2% for telecommunication equipment, and 17.9%, 17.2%, and 11.0% for industrial machinery. The sources in these gaps are due to the shorter ASL and the higher DBR in Japan and Canada, compared to the U.S. The exceptional asset is computers. Japan’s rate of depreciation for computers is estimated as 29.6%, compared to 43.1% in Canada and 33.9% in the U.S. The gap is originated from much longer ASL observed in Japan (8.0 years on average), compared to Canada (4.9 years).

  • "Progress on Measuring the Industry Origins of the Japan-U.S. Productivity Gap"

    Dale W. Jorgenson, Koji Nomura, and Jon D. Samuels

    Fifth World KLEMS Conference, Harvard University  2018.06

    Research paper (other science council materials etc.), Joint Work, Except for reviews

  • "Rebalancing Benchmark Input-Output Production System by Revision in Margin Matrix"

    Koji Nomura and Kozo Miyagawa

    Economic Statistics Research (Keizai Sangyo Toukei Kyokai)  46 ( I ) 29 - 55 2018.06

    Research paper (bulletin of university, research institution), Joint Work, Except for reviews

  • "Productivity Growth in Asia and its Country Origins"

    Koji Nomura

    Des Kusum Das (eds.) Productivity Dynamics in Emerging and Industrialized Countries (Routledge)     81 - 112 2018.04

    Research paper (other science council materials etc.), Single Work, Except for reviews,  ISSN  9781138745506

     View Summary

    © 2018 selection and editorial matter, Deb Kusum Das; individual chapters, the contributors. Recovery from the global financial crisis of 2008-09 has been notably slow in the European economy, with its growth rate for 2010-14 steady at 0.5 percent per annum on average, relative to 2.1 percent growth in the pre-crisis period of 2000-07 (as represented by 15 member countries of EU prior to enlargement). In contrast, the United States has managed to raise its growth rate to 1.9 percent for 2010-14, and is beginning to return to its long-term growth track. The Asian economy, which has become increasingly autonomous from the Western economies and even contributed to stabilizing the global economy at the time of the global financial crisis, has been maintaining a stable economic growth of 5.3 percent per annum on average during 2010-14. Yet, this represents a slowdown of 1 percentage point from the level recorded in the pre-crisis period. Our study indicates that it is mainly due to the reduction in the growth of total factor productivity (TFP) of the Asian economy.

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Papers, etc., Registered in KOARA 【 Display / hide

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Reviews, Commentaries, etc. 【 Display / hide

  • 「エネルギー生産性改善と隠れた構造変化」

    Koji Nomura

    RIETI コラム (RIETI)   2019.06

    Introduction and explanation (bulletin of university, research institution), Single Work

  • Economic impacts of non-nuclear power policy in South Korea

    Koji Nomura

    Energy Policy Report (Energy Forum Inc.)   2019.05

    Introduction and explanation (commerce magazine), Single Work

  • Borrowed Technology and Unintended Energy Productivity Improvement

    Koji Nomura

    Energy Policy Report (Energy Forum Inc.)   2019.02

    Introduction and explanation (commerce magazine), Single Work

  • "Measuring Quality-adjusted Price and Quantity of Education Outputs in Japan"

    Koji Nomura

    内閣府経済社会総合研究所委託研究報告書 (Keio Economic Observatory, Keio University)   2019.02

    Prompt report, short report, and research note, etc. (bulletin of university, research institution), Single Work

     View Summary

    日本の国民経済計算体系(Japanese System of National Accounts: JSNA)では、「統計改革の基本方針」(平成28年12月経済財政諮問会議決定)および「統計改革推進会議最終取りまとめ」(平成29年5月統計改革推進会議決定)などに基づき、教育サービスの精度改善および国際的な比較可能性の向上を目的として、教育の質の変化を反映した産出指数(quality-adjusted quantity index)および価格指数(quality-adjusted price index)の開発が求められている 。本調査研究ではそのために必要な新たなデータベースを構築した上で、産出数量法、投入法、そしてハイブリッド法といったさまざまなアプローチに基づく試算をおこない、教育サービスの望ましい数量と価格の測定量を模索することを目的としている。

  • Bhutanese Economic Growth Led by Hydropower

    Koji Nomura

    Energy Policy Report (Energy Forum Inc.)   2018.10

    Introduction and explanation (commerce magazine), Single Work

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Presentations 【 Display / hide

  • Measuring Quality-adjusted Price and Quantity of Education Outputs in Japan

    Koji Nomura

    ESRI Workshop, 2019.02, Oral Presentation(guest/special)

  • Are We Entering a New Golden Age of Energy Productivity Improvement?-Lessons from the Japanese economy in the 20th century and the prospects for 2050

    Koji Nomura

    FY2018 ALPS International Symposium (Toranomon Hills, Tokyo) , 2019.02, Symposium, Workshop, Panelist (nomination), RITE

  • "Will the Golden Age of Energy Productivity Improvement Realize Again?" (in Japanese)

    Koji Nomura

    Japan Society of Energy and Resources (JSER) (Kozo Keikau Engineering Inc.) , 2018.11, Oral Presentation(general), Japan Society of Energy and Resources (JSER)

  • "Long-term Economic Growth and Energy Productivity Improvement in Japan - Changes in Energy Quality and Industry Outputs" (in Japanese)

    Koji Nomura

    RITE ALPS III (Tokyo) , 2018.03, Oral Presentation(general), RITE

  • "Productivity Gaps and Industrial Competitiveness"

    Koji Nomura

    RIETI BSWS (RIETI, Tokyo) , 2017.12, Oral Presentation(general)

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Works 【 Display / hide

  • Development of Time-series Extended Input-Output Table for Education Sector (EIOT)

    Koji Nomura and Hiroshi Shirane

    Economic and Social Research Institute, Cabinet Office, and Keio Economic Observatory, 

    2018.08
    -
    2019.02

    Database, Joint

  • Development of Database on Education Service Outputs of Japan (ESJ)

    Koji Nomura, Hiroshi Shirane, Masafumi Yamamoto, and Yu Fujii

    Economic and Social Research Institute, Cabinet Office, and Keio Economic Observatory, 

    2018.06
    -
    2019.02

    Database, Joint

  • Development of KEO Database 2018 (Industry-Level Productivity Database)

    Koji Nomura, Hiroshi Shirane, and Shiori Nakayama

    Keio Economic Observatory, Keio University, 

    2018.01
    -
    2018.07

    Database, Joint

  • Development of APO Productivity Database 2018

    Koji Nomura, Hiroshi Shirane, Shiori Nakayama, and Naoyuki Akashi

    Asian Productivity Organization and Keio Economic Observatory, 

    2017.10
    -
    2018.09

    Database, Joint

  • Development of Asia QALI Database 2018

    Koji Nomura and Naoyuki Akashi

    Keio Economic Observatory, Keio University, 

    2017.01
    -
    2018.10

    Database, Joint

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Awards 【 Display / hide

  • The 48th Nikkei Award (Nikkei Keizai-Tosho-Bunka-Sho)

    NOMURA KOJI, 2005.11, Nihon Keizai Shimbun, Measurement of Capital and Productivity

    Type of Award: Other Awards

  • Keio Award

    NOMURA KOJI, 2005.11, Keio Univeristy

    Type of Award: Keio commendation etc.

 

Courses Taught 【 Display / hide

  • THEORY OF INDEX NUMBERS

    2019

  • SEMINAR

    2019

  • INPUT-OUTPUT ANALYSIS

    2019

 

Social Activities 【 Display / hide

  • Japan's Energy Mix (News Study Room)

    Sankei Living Shimbun

    2019.03
  • Commentator, ISFJ Policy Forum

    Inter-university Seminar for the Future of Japan

    2018.12
  • White Paper on Manufacturing Industries

    METI

    2018.05
  • Was Japan's Productivity in Manufacturing Deteriorated?

    Yomiuri Shimbun

    2018.03
  • Energy Transition in Germany & Japan: Consensus and Controversy (Outreach Event of the GJETC)

    German-Japanese Energy Transition Council (GJETC), Outreach Event of the GJETC (Conference Center in the building of Bundespressekonferenz, Berlin, Germany)

    2018.02

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Committee Experiences 【 Display / hide

  • 2019.04
    -
    2020.03

    客員主任研究員, 日本政策投資銀行 設備投資研究所

  • 2019.04
    -
    2020.03

    編集評議委員, 内閣府経済社会総合研究所 『経済分析』編集評議委員会

  • 2019.04
    -
    2020.03

    客員主任研究官, 内閣府経済社会総合研究所

  • 2019.04
    -
    2020.03

    編集委員, 内閣府経済社会総合研究所 『経済分析』編集委員会

  • 2019.01
    -
    2020.03

    委員, 科学技術振興機構 低炭素社会戦略センター 低炭素社会戦略推進委員会

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