Nagoshi, Narihito

写真a

Affiliation

School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery (Shinanomachi)

Position

Senior Assistant Professor (Non-tenured)/Assistant Professor (Non-tenured)

Profile 【 Display / hide

  • My major field is spine and spinal cord surgery. I am engaged in spinal cord injury research. I make effort for clinics and research to make a realization of regenerative medicine for spinal cord injury.

Career 【 Display / hide

  • 2016.01
    -
    Present

    Keio University School of Medicine, Orthopaedic Surgery, Assisstant professor

  • 2014.01
    -
    2016.01

    Toronto Western Hospital Institute, Division of Genetics and Development, Post-doctoral fellow

  • 2013.07
    -
    2013.12

    Hokkaido Chuo Rosai Hospital, Spinal Cord Injury Center, Orthopaedic Surgery, Chief of medical doctor

  • 2009.04
    -
    2013.06

    Murayama Clinical Center, Orthopaedic Surgery, Medical doctor

Academic Background 【 Display / hide

  • 2005.04
    -
    2009.03

    Keio University, Graduate School of Medicine, Orthopaedic Surgery

    Japan, Graduate School, Graduated, Doctoral course

  • 1996.04
    -
    2002.03

    Keio University, Medicine

    Japan, University, Graduated, Other

Academic Degrees 【 Display / hide

  • 医学博士, Keio University, Dissertation, 2009.03

Licenses and Qualifications 【 Display / hide

  • 日本医師会認定産業医

  • Japanese Medical License Registration, 2002.05

  • Board-certificated Spine Surgeon, 2014

 

Research Areas 【 Display / hide

  • Orthopaedic surgery

Research Keywords 【 Display / hide

  • Spinal Cord Injury

  • Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

Research Themes 【 Display / hide

  • Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy, 

    2014.01
    -
    Present

  • Cell transplantation therapy for spinal cord injury, 

    2005.04
    -
    Present

 

Books 【 Display / hide

  • Neural Crest Stem Cells –Breakthroughs and Applications

    Narihito NagoshiHideyuki Okano, World Scientific, 2011

Papers 【 Display / hide

  • The Impact of Depression and Bipolar Disorders on Functional and Quality of Life Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Surgery for Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy: Analysis of a Combined Prospective Dataset

    Tetreault, L., Nagoshi, N., Nakashima, H., Singh, A., Kopjar, B., Arnold, P. and Fehlings, M. G.

    Spine (Phila Pa 1976)  2016.07

    ISSN  1528-1159

     View Summary

    STUDY DESIGN: Analysis of a combined prospective dataset. OBJECTIVE: To compare clinical outcomes in patients with and without preexisting depression or bipolar disorder undergoing surgery for degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM). SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Psychiatric co-morbidities, including depression, have been associated with worse clinical outcomes following lumbar spine surgery; however, it is unclear whether these psychiatric disorders are also predictive of outcomes in patients undergoing surgery for the treatment of DCM. METHODS: Four hundred and one patients with symptomatic DCM were enrolled in the prospective AOSpine International or North America study at twelve North American sites. Patients were evaluated preoperatively and at 6-, 12- and 24-months using the modified Japanese Orthopedic Association scale (mJOA), Nurick score, Neck Disability Index (NDI), and Short- Form 36v2 (SF-36) Health Survey. A mixed model analytic approach was used to evaluate differences in outcomes at 24-months between patients with and without psychiatric disorders, while controlling for relevant baseline characteristics and surgical factors. RESULTS: Ninety-seven patients (24.19%) were diagnosed with preexisting depression or bipolar disorder. There were more females (65.98%) with these psychiatric disorders than males (34.02%) (p < 0.0001). Patients with psychiatric co-morbidities were more likely to have cardiovascular (p = 0.0177), respiratory (p < 0.0001), gastrointestinal (p < 0.0001), rheumatologic (p = 0.0109) and neurologic (p = 0.0309) disorders. At 24-months following surgery, patients in both groups demonstrated significant improvements on the mJOA, Nurick, NDI and SF-36 Physical Component Score (PCS). Patients with depression or bipolar disorder, however, did not exhibit a significant or clinically important change on the SF-36 Mental Component Score (MCS). There were no differences in mJOA and Nurick scores at 24-months between patients in each group. Improvement in NDI, SF-36 PCS and MCS, however, were smaller in patients with depression or bipolar disorder than those without. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with depression or bipolar disorder have smaller functional and quality of life improvements following surgery compared to patients without psychiatric co-morbidities.

  • Does age affect surgical outcomes in patients with degenerative cervical myelopathy? Results from the prospective multicenter AOSpine International study on 479 patients

    Nakashima, H., Tetreault, L. A., Nagoshi, N., Nouri, A., Kopjar, B., Arnold, P. M., Bartels, R., Defino, H., Kale, S., Zhou, Q. and Fehlings, M. G.

    J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 87 ( 7 ) 734 - 40 2016.07

    ISSN  1468-330X

     View Summary

    BACKGROUND: In general, older patients with degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM) are felt to have lower recovery potential following surgery due to increased degenerative pathology, comorbidities, reduced physiological reserves and age-related changes to the spinal cord. This study aims to determine whether age truly is an independent predictor of surgical outcome and to provide evidence to guide practice and decision-making. METHODS: A total of 479 patients with DCM were prospectively enrolled in the CSM-International study at 16 centres. Our sample was divided into a younger group (<65 years) and an elderly (>/=65 years) group. A mixed model analytic approach was used to evaluate differences in the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA), Nurick, Short Form-36 (SF-36) and Neck Disability Index (NDI) scores between groups. We first created an unadjusted model between age and surgical outcome and then developed two adjusted models that accounted for variations in (1) baseline characteristics and (2) both baseline and surgical factors. RESULTS: Of the 479 patients, 360 (75.16%) were <65 years and 119 (24.84%) were >/=65 years. Elderly patients had a worse preoperative health status (p<0.0001) and were functionally more severe (p<0.0001). The majority of younger patients (64.96%) underwent anterior surgery, whereas the preferred approach in the elderly group was posterior (58.62%, p<0.0001). Elderly patients had a greater number of decompressed levels than younger patients (p<0.0001). At 24 months after surgery, younger patients achieved a higher postoperative mJOA (p<0.0001) and a lower Nurick score (p<0.0001) than elderly patients. After adjustments for patient and surgical characteristics, these differences in postoperative outcome scores decreased but remained significant. CONCLUSIONS: Older age is an independent predictor of functional status in patients with DCM. However, patients over 65 with DCM still achieve functionally significant improvement after surgical decompression.

  • Do Caucasians and East Asians have Different Outcomes Following Surgery for the Treatment of Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy? Results from the Prospective Multicenter AOSpine International Study

    Nagoshi, N., Tetreault, L. A., Nakashima, H., Nouri, A., Arnold, P., Zileli, M., Tan, G., Kopjar, B. and Fehlings, M. G.

    Spine (Phila Pa 1976)  2016.03

    ISSN  1528-1159

     View Summary

    STUDY DESIGN: Prospective multicenter cohort study. OBJECTIVE: To compare outcomes of surgery for the treatment for DCM between Caucasians and East Asians. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Numerous studies have indicated that race can influence both disease prevalence and clinical prognosis in a variety of medical conditions; however, none have evaluated the impact of race on surgical outcomes in patients with degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM). METHODS: Four hundred and seventy-nine patients with symptomatic DCM were enrolled in the prospective AOSpine CSM-International study at 16 global sites. Preoperatively and at each follow-up, patients were evaluated using the modified Japanese Orthopedic Association scale (mJOA), the Nurick score, the Neck Disability Index (NDI), and the Short- Form 36 (SF-36) Health Survey. A mixed model analytic approach was used to evaluate differences in outcomes between races at 24 months postoperatively, while controlling for relevant baseline characteristics and surgical factors. RESULTS: Three hundred and twenty-four (67.64%) patients were Caucasian and 106 (22.13%) were East Asian. There was no difference in the incidence of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) between the two races; however a greater percentage of Caucasians in India (46.15%) and Turkey (41.38%) displayed evidence of OPLL than Caucasians in other regions (p < 0.001). The frequency of spondylosis was significantly higher in Caucasians (p < 0.001). Caucasians had a longer duration of symptoms (27.33 +/- 34.47 months) than East Asians (23.11 +/- 35.68 months) (p < 0.001), and a lower preoperative score on the SF-36 Physical Component Score (33.85 +/- 9.04) compared to East Asians (37.47 +/- 8.67) (p < 0.001). At 24-months after surgery, there were no differences in functional status or QOL between East Asians and Caucasians, after adjusting for baseline characteristics, surgical preferences and disease causation. Rates of perioperative complications were not significantly different between the races (p = 0.261). CONCLUSIONS: Decompressive surgery for DCM results in comparable functional gains and is equally safe in Caucasians and East Asians. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 2.

  • Comparison of Outcomes of Surgical Treatment for Ossification of the Posterior Longitudinal Ligament Versus Other Forms of Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy: Results from the Prospective, Multicenter AOSpine CSM-International Study of 479 Patients

    Nakashima, H., Tetreault, L., Nagoshi, N., Nouri, A., Arnold, P., Yukawa, Y., Toyone, T., Tanaka, M., Zhou, Q. and Fehlings, M. G.

    J Bone Joint Surg Am 98 ( 5 ) 370 - 8 2016.03

    ISSN  1535-1386

     View Summary

    BACKGROUND: Degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM) is an all-encompassing term that includes cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM), ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL), and other spinal abnormalities that cause cervical cord compression. It is unclear whether surgery is equally effective and safe for patients with OPLL as it is for those with other forms of DCM. The purpose of this study was to compare surgical outcomes of patients with OPLL and those with other forms of DCM. METHODS: Four hundred and seventy-nine patients with symptomatic DCM were prospectively enrolled in the CSM-International study at sixteen sites. Patients' functional status was evaluated using the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association scale (mJOA) and the Nurick score. Quality of life was assessed using patient-reported outcome measures, including the Neck Disability Index (NDI) and the Short Form (SF)-36. Postoperative functional and quality-of-life outcomes were assessed at two years of follow-up, and scores were compared between patients with and without OPLL. RESULTS: Of 479 patients, 135 (28.2%) had radiographic evidence of OPLL, and 344 (71.8%) had other forms of DCM. The two groups did not differ significantly in demographics, surgical approach, or baseline myelopathy severity. Patients with OPLL achieved similar functional outcomes by two years following surgery compared with patients with other forms of DCM. With respect to quality of life, the NDI and most of the subscales of the SF-36 were not different between the two diagnostic groups. There was a higher risk of perioperative complications in the OPLL group (p = 0.054), although this relationship did not reach statistical significance. Rates of neurological complications did not differ significantly between diagnostic groups. CONCLUSIONS: Surgical decompression for the treatment of OPLL resulted in improvements in functional status and quality of life comparable to those seen in patients with other forms of DCM. Patients with OPLL were at a higher risk of perioperative complications than patients with other forms of DCM.

  • Commentary: Preclinical Validation of Multilevel Intraparenchymal Stem Cell Therapy in the Porcine Spinal Cord

    Nagoshi, N., Nakashima, H. and Fehlings, M. G.

    Neurosurgery 78 ( 2 ) E309 2016.02

    ISSN  1524-4040

display all >>

Papers, etc., Registered in KOARA 【 Display / hide

Research Projects of Competitive Funds, etc. 【 Display / hide

  • Efficacy of C5a antagonist for human iPS-derived neural precursor cells transplanted into injured spinal cord

    2017.04
    -
    2020.03

    MEXT,JSPS, Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research, 名越 慈人, Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (B), Principal Investigator

  • 再生医療実用化研究事業 再生医療等安全性確保法に従って実施する臨床研究

    2016.09
    -
    2019.03

    Masaya Nakamura, Research grant, Co-investigator

  • Grat from the General Insurance Association of Japan

    2016
    -
    2017

    Research grant, Principal Investigator

  • Postdoctoral Fellowship for Research Abroad, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science

    2014.01
    -
    2016.01

    Research grant, Principal Investigator

  • Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (C), Japan

    2012
    -
    2014

    Research grant, Principal Investigator

display all >>

Awards 【 Display / hide

  • North American Spine Society Research Traveling Fellowship Award

    2015.10, North American Spine Society, Human direct reprogramming neural precursor cells - a novel source for cell replacement therapy in spinal cord injury

    Type of Award: International Academic Awards.  Country: USA

  • Best Paper Award

    2011.04, Cervical Spine Research Society (Asian Pacific Section), Schwann cell plasticity shown by neural crest lineage tracing

    Type of Award: International Academic Awards

  • Incentive Award from the Japanese Orthopedic Association

    2010.05, Ontogeny and multipotency of neural crest-derived stem cells in mouse bone marrow, dorsal root ganglia, and whisker pad

    Type of Award: Awards of National Conference, Council and Symposium

  • Distinguished Award from the Japanese Society for Regenerative Medicine

    2010.03, Schwann cell plasticity after spinal cord injury shown by neural crest lineage tracing

    Type of Award: Awards of National Conference, Council and Symposium

  • Medical Research Award from the Tokyo Medical Association

    2010, Ontogeny and multipotency of neural crest-derived stem cells in mouse bone marrow, dorsal root ganglia, and whisker pad

    Type of Award: Awards of National Conference, Council and Symposium

display all >>

 

Courses Taught 【 Display / hide

  • LECTURE SERIES, ORTHOPAEDICS

    2020

  • ADVANCED MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES

    2020

  • LECTURE SERIES, ORTHOPAEDICS

    2019

  • ADVANCED MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES

    2019